10 Totally Bizarre Driving Laws in the US

As a whole, Americans know to drive on the right side of the road, wear their seatbelts and obey traffic signs, but for many states in the great USofA, additional laws are needed to clarify the obvious and not-so-obvious rules of the road. We’d like to think that these laws were created to ensure safety, but most are just needed to punish stupidity. Here are 10 totally bizarre driving laws in the US:

  1. No Tire Screeching in Kansas

    When you’re cruising through Derby, Kansas, don’t even think about screeching your tires while driving, or you could end up with a hefty fine of $500 and a possible imprisonment of 30 days in jail. This standard traffic ordinance is considered a misdemeanor, but it’s also a statewide law.

  2. No Improper Opening or Leaving Open a Car Door

    The state of Oregon has cracked down on drivers who open or leave their car door open on the side of traffic, pedestrians and bicyclists when it’s unsafe to do so, or “for a period of time longer than necessary to load and unload passengers.” This improper opening or leaving open a car door is considered a Class D traffic infraction and could cost you $90 in fines.

  3. No Swearing and Driving in Maryland

    Keep your swear words to yourself (or whisper them softly) while driving through Rockville, Maryland, because it’s considered a misdemeanor to swear from a vehicle within earshot of other people in this part of the state. Your curse words could cost you up to $100 in fines or 90 days in jail.

  4. No Driving Blindfolded in Alabama

    This one doesn’t need much explanation, nor should it even have to be a written law. Driving while blindfolded has never been a good idea, but that hasn’t stopped some adventurous ‘Bama residents from testing their blind driving skills.

  5. No Storing Trash in Your Car in South Carolina

    Better take your trash out before you take your car for a spin in Hilton Head, South Carolina, because it’s illegal to store garbage in your vehicle. This traffic ordinance is more like a health-code violation because the state doesn’t want drivers harboring rats in their vehicles. This violation could cost you $500 in fines or 30 days in jail.

  6. No Driving with Mud on Your Tires in Minnetonka, Minnesota

    Better keep your car and your tires clean when driving in Minnetonka, Minnesota, where it’s illegal to drive on the street or highway with muddy, dirty and sticky tires. This public nuisance and traffic violation is a misdemeanor charge and could cost you up to $2,000 in fines.

  7. No Undressing in Your Car in New York

    Before you think about stripping down in your vehicle, know that it’s illegal to take your clothes off in your car while in Sag Harbor, New York. Even though this town is full of beachgoers, you’ve got to keep your clothes on in public, or pay a fine of $100 or risk spending 90 days in jail.

  8. No Honking Your Car Horn Where Cold Drinks or Sandwiches are Served After 9 P.M. in Arkansas

    Yep, you read that right. It’s illegal for drivers in Little Rock, Arkansas, to sound their horn anywhere cold beverages or sandwiches are served after 9 p.m. This had to be a reoccurring problem to actually become a real law.

  9. No Sleeping on the Street in California

    As comfortable as concrete is, you can’t sleep on it in Eureka, California. It’s illegal to snooze on any sidewalk, alley or street here, and if you dare to do so, it’ll cost you $1,000 in fines and possibly six months in jail for this misdemeanor.

  10. No Parking at Dunkin’ Donuts in Maine

    America might run on Dunkin, but that doesn’t mean you can park at one when you’re in Maine. Believe it or not, it’s illegal to park in front of the Dunkin’ Donuts shop on Main Street in South Berwick, Maine, because it is part of a no-parking zone and parking would severely block traffic on the road. So, you’d better stick to drive thru, or park somewhere else and walk unless you want to get slapped with a $175 fine or jail time up to 30 days.

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